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Description of key information

Magnesium carbonate is not considered to be acutely harmful by the oral route. Testing via the dermal and inhalation routes is not required or scientifically justified.

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Additional information

Acute toxicity - Oral route:

The oral LD50 for magnesium carbonate when administered to rats was >2000 mg/kg bw.

Magnesium is also essential for life and occurs in the natural environment. Humans are widely exposed to naturally occurring magnesium carbonate and chloride, e.g. via drinking water and food on a day to day basis. Ingested magnesium, carbonate and chloride ions are actively regulated by the body and are therefore not considered to be systemically toxic in standard test systems.

Acute toxicity - Dermal route: Dermal toxicity to magnesium carbonate is considered to be unlikely due to the inorganic nature of the substance limiting absorption through the skin and the lack of systemic toxicity seen in the acute oral toxicity study.

Furthermore, magnesium carbonate is an approved ingredient of cosmetics for topical application to skin.

Acute toxicity - Inhalation route: Magnesium carbonate is always prepared and used as a suspension. Therefore, inhalation of magnesium carbonate is not considered to be a likely route of exposure.

Justification for classification or non-classification

Oral: The oral LD50 for rats was > 2000 mg/kg bw in an OECD Guideline 420 study. Therefore the substance does not require classification according to the criteria described in Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008.

Dermal: Dermal toxicity to magnesium carbonate is considered to be unlikely due to the inorganic nature of the substance limiting absorption through the skin and the lack of systemic toxicity seen in the acute oral toxicity study. Therefore, magnesium carbonate does not require classification according to the criteria described in Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008.

Inhalation: Inhalation of magnesium carbonate is not considered to be a likely route of exposure. Therefore, magnesium carbonate does not require classification according to the criteria described in Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008.