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Environmental fate & pathways

Hydrolysis

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Endpoint:
hydrolysis
Data waiving:
study scientifically not necessary / other information available
Justification for data waiving:
other:
Endpoint:
hydrolysis
Type of information:
other: Technical Discussion
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Data are from a peer reviewed source.
Justification for type of information:
A discussion and report on the read across strategy is given as an attachment in IUCLID Section 13.
Reason / purpose:
read-across: supporting information
Principles of method if other than guideline:
Technical discussion
Conclusions:
Hydrolysis is not expected to be a significant mechanism of degradation in the environment because hydrocarbons, C11-C14, n-alkanes, isoalkanes, cyclics, aromatics (2-25%) lack a hydrotically reactive functional group. Therefore, hydrocarbons are not subject to hydrolysis and this fate process will not contribute to the degradative loss of the substance from the environment.
Executive summary:

Hydrolysis is a reaction in which a water molecule of hydroxide ion substitutes for another atom of group of atoms present in a chemical resulting in a structural change of that chemical. Potentially hydrolysable groups include alkyl halides, amides, carbamates, carboxylic acid esters and lactone epoxides, phosphate esters, and sulfonic acid esters. The lack of a suitable leaving group renders compounds resistant to hydrolysis.

The chemical constituents that comprise this substance consist entirely of carbon and hydrogen and do not contain hydrolysable groups. As such, they have a very low potential to hydrolyze. Therefore this degradative process will not contribute to their removal from the environment.

Endpoint:
hydrolysis
Type of information:
other: Technical Discussion
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Data are from a peer reviewed source.
Justification for type of information:
A discussion and report on the read across strategy is given as an attachment in IUCLID Section 13.
Reason / purpose:
read-across: supporting information
Principles of method if other than guideline:
Technical discussion
Conclusions:
Hydrolysis is not expected to be a significant mechanism of degradation in the environment because hydrocarbons, C11-C14, n-alkanes, isoalkanes, cyclics, aromatics (2-25%) lack a hydrotically reactive functional group. Therefore, hydrocarbons are not subject to hydrolysis and this fate process will not contribute to the degradative loss of the substance from the environment.
Executive summary:

Hydrolysis is a reaction in which a water molecule of hydroxide ion substitutes for another atom of group of atoms present in a chemical resulting in a structural change of that chemical. Potentially hydrolysable groups include alkyl halides, amides, carbamates, carboxylic acid esters and lactone epoxides, phosphate esters, and sulfonic acid esters. The lack of a suitable leaving group renders compounds resistant to hydrolysis.

The chemical constituents that comprise this substance consist entirely of carbon and hydrogen and do not contain hydrolysable groups. As such, they have a very low potential to hydrolyze. Therefore this degradative process will not contribute to their removal from the environment.

Description of key information

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Additional information

Hydrolysis is a reaction in which a water molecule or hydroxide ion substitutes for another atom or group of atoms present in a chemical resulting in a structural change of that chemical. Potentially hydrolyzable groups include alkyl halides, amides, carbamates, carboxylic acid esters and lactones, epoxides, phosphate esters, and sulfonic acid esters. The lack of a suitable leaving group renders compounds resistant to hydrolysis.

The chemical constituents that comprise hydrocarbons, C9-C14, n-alkanes, isoalkanes, cyclics, aromatics (2-25%), consist entirely of carbon and hydrogen and do not contain hydrolyzable groups. As such, they have a very low potential to hydrolyze. Therefore, this degradative process will not contribute to their removal from the environment.