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Description of key information

Short description of key information on bioaccumulation potential result:

Exposure to the substance is very unlikely by inhalation due to the extremely low vapour pressure.  Ingestion is not a likely route of exposure and the corrosive / irritant effects would limit accidental oral exposure.  The corrosive properties of the substance will limit the potential for repeated or prolonged skin exposure so dermal absorption should be limited.  There is data available on the metabolism of the related primary amines which is considered appropriate also for the 2,2’-(C16-18 (even numbered, C18 unsaturated) alkyl imino) diethanol CAS No 1218787-32-6 .

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Bioaccumulation potential:
low bioaccumulation potential

Additional information

2,2’-(C16-18 (even numbered, C18 unsaturated) alkyl imino) diethanol CAS No 1218787-32-6 is very unlikely by inhalation due to the extremely low vapour pressure and its physical form which is a paste at ambient temperatures. Ingestion is not a likely route of exposure and the corrosive / irritant effects would limit accidental oral exposure. The corrosive properties of the substance will limit the potential for repeated or prolonged skin exposure so dermal absorption should be limited. It is likely that once this substance enters the body due to it’s lypophylic nature to be transported via the lymphatic system to the nearest draining lymph node rather than in the blood. This is supported by evidence from oral dosing studies in animals which indicate that in digestive tract the test substance when absorbed it is transported to the draining mesenteric lymph nodes. It is likely that the macrophages will then ingest the material and it would then be metabolised.

Due to the irritant nature of this substance the required risk management measures to handle them should minimise the potential for contact with the skin. However due to the corrosive properties which would compromise the barrier properties of the skin, exposure to the test substance would have to be assumed to result in 100% absorption. For formulation containing the test substance at a non-corrosive concentration, the high octanol water partition coefficient of Log Kow 3.4 would reduce its potential for being absorbed through the skin. Although the test substance molecular weight of ca. 350 is less than 500 it would still be expected to be less absorption than the 100% default.

 

Once absorbed there is no specific information on the metabolism, distribution and excretion of primary fatty amine ethoxylates. However there is information on the related primary fatty amines, metabolism distribution and excretion of the primary fatty amine ethoxylates are expected to be similar.

 

Primary alkylamines are not bioaccumulating and metabolized rapidly by general oxidative pathways. They are oxidatively deaminated by monoaminooxidases with concomitant formation of ammonia and the corresponding alkylamine aldehyde. Subsequently, the aldehydes are oxidised by aldehyde dehydrogenases to the corresponding carboxylic acids, which, in turn, are further metabolized by B-oxidation. Carbon dioxide as the final product from B-oxidation is exhaled. Urinary excretion is a minor elimination pathway.

Discussion on bioaccumulation potential result:

Exposure to the substance is very unlikely by inhalation due to the extremely low vapour pressure and the physical form of the substnace which is a paste at ambient temperatures. Ingestion is not a likely route of exposure and the corrosive / irritant effects would limit accidental oral exposure. The corrosive properties of the substance will limit the potential for repeated or prolonged skin exposure so dermal absorption should be limited. It is likely that once this substance enters the body due to it’s lypophylic nature to be transported via the lymphatic system to the nearest draining lymph node rather than in the blood. This is supported by evidence from oral dosing studies in animals which indicate that in digestive tract the test substance when absorbed it is transported to the draining mesenteric lymph nodes. It is likely that the macrophages will then ingest the material and it would then be metabolised.

 

Once absorbed there is no specific information on the metabolism, distribution and excretion of primary fatty amine ethoxylates. However there is information on the related primary fatty amines, metabolism distribution and excretion of the primary fatty amine ethoxylates are expected to be similar.

 

Primary alkylamines are not bioaccumulating and metabolized rapidly by general oxidative pathways. They are oxidatively deaminated by monoaminooxidases with concomitant formation of ammonia and the corresponding alkylamine aldehyde. Subsequently, the aldehydes are oxidised by aldehyde dehydrogenases to the corresponding carboxylic acids, which, in turn, are further metabolized by B-oxidation. Carbon dioxide as the final product from B-oxidation is exhaled. Urinary excretion is a minor elimination pathway.