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Ecotoxicological information

Short-term toxicity to fish

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Description of key information

The LC50 for short-term fish toxicity (96h) of L-alanine is 26300 mg/L. The value was estimated by QSAR prediction based on trend analysis.

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Fresh water fish

Fresh water fish
Effect concentration:
26 300 mg/L

Marine water fish

Marine water fish
Effect concentration:
26 300 mg/L

Additional information

No experimental data for L-alanine with regard to fish toxicity is available.

No toxicity at the limit concentration was observed in acute toxicity studies with daphnia (according to OECD202) and algae (according to OECD201) indicating that the substance has a very low / no hazard potential for aquatic organisms. Further, as the substance (in protein) is a basic component of fish food it is very unlikely that fish in an OECD203 study exposed to limit concentrations (100 mg/l) of L-alanine show any adverse effect. Therefore and for animal welfare reasons is seems sufficient to use an in silico approach to predict the LC50 for short-term fish toxicity (96h). An estimation by QSAR based on trend analysis results in a LC50 (96h) of L-alanine of 26300 mg/L.

Toxicity to fish (LC50) as predicted from Ecosar v0.99g is 383000 mg/l (Ecological Categorization Results from the Canadian Domestic Substance List, 2006).

The very low toxicity of proteinogenic amino acids to fish is further supported by two OECD203 studies with L-valine and D/L-methionine. Read-across was applied because of similar physico-chemical characteristics, a similar toxicological/ecotoxicological profile and the structural similarity of these amino acids to L-alanine. Brachydanio rerio exposed to 1000 mg/l L-valine in a limit study showed no signs of toxicity. The same was true if this species was exposed to D/L-methionine. Here Brachydanio rerio showed no signs of toxicity even at the highest concentration tested (3200 mg/l).

Another supporting study indicates that L-alanine does not cause any impact on the behaviour of fish.