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Ecotoxicological information

Toxicity to terrestrial plants

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
toxicity to terrestrial plants
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Already evaluated by the Competent Authorities for Biocides and Existing Substance Regulations.

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Effect of a copper gradient on plant community structure
Author:
Strandberg B., J.A. Axelsen, M.B. Pedersen, J. Jensen and M.J. Attrill
Year:
2006
Bibliographic source:
Environ Toxicol Chem., Vol. 25, No. 3, pp. 743-753, 2006

Materials and methods

Principles of method if other than guideline:
This study was designed to determine the effect of a copper gradient on a natural plant community structure.

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent

Test organisms

open allclose all
Species:
other: community level study
Species:
other: Fallopia convolvulus (Black bindweed)

Study design

Study type:
field study
Substrate type:
natural soil

Results and discussion

Effect concentrations
Dose descriptor:
other: see summary
Remarks on result:
other: see summary

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
Plant community composition was significantly correlated with soil copper concentration and community composition at soil copper concentrations above 200 mg/kg differed significantly from community composition at lower copper levels
Executive summary:

Vegetation data including plant cover, biomass, species richness and vegetation height was sampled on a copper-contaminated field with total copper contents varying from 50 to almost 3000 mg/kg soil. The field was covered by early succession grassland dominated by Agrostis stolonifera. Plant cover, biomass, species richness and vegetation height generally decreased with increasing copper content, although the highest biomass was reached at intermediate copper concentrations. Multivariate statistical analyses showed that plant community composition was significantly correlated with soil copper concentration and that community composition at soil copper concentrations above 200 mg/kg differed significantly from community composition at lower copper levels. Comparison of single-species (Black Bindweed, Fallopia convolvulus) performance at the field site and in laboratory tests involving field soil and spiked soil indicates that the laboratory tests conventionally applied for risk assessment purposes do not overestimate copper effects. Interaction between copper and other stressors operating only in the field probably balance the higher bioavailability in spiked soils.