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Environmental fate & pathways

Hydrolysis

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Description of key information

The following is taken into account for any hazard/risk/persistency assessment:

Aliphatic alcohols are resistant to hydrolysis because they lack a functional group that is hydrolytically reactive. Therefore, this fate process will not contribute to a measurable degradative loss of this substance from the environment

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Additional information

Hydrolysis of an organic molecule occurs when a molecule (R-X) reacts with water (H2O) to form a new carbon-oxygen bond after the carbon-X bond is cleaved. Mechanistically, this reaction is referred to as a nucleophilic substitution reaction, where X is the leaving group being replaced by the incoming nucleophilic oxygen from the water molecule.

Chemicals that are susceptible to hydrolysis contain functional groups that can be displaced by a nucleophilic substitution reaction.
 Substances that have the potential to hydrolyze include alkyl halides, amides, carbamates, carboxylic acid esters and lactones, epoxides, phosphate esters, and sulfonic acid esters. The lack of a leaving group renders a compound resistant to hydrolysis.

Aliphatic alcohols are resistant to hydrolysis because they lack a functional group that is hydrolytically reactive.
Therefore, this fate process will not contribute to a measurable degradative loss of this substance from the environment.