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Ecotoxicological information

Toxicity to terrestrial plants

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
toxicity to terrestrial plants: long-term
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Already evaluated by the Competent Authorities for Biocides and Existing Substance Regulations.
Cross-reference
Reason / purpose:
reference to same study

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Relation of copper extractable from soil and pH to copper content and growth of two citrus rootstocks
Author:
Mozaffari, M. et al.
Year:
1996
Bibliographic source:
Soil Sci. 1996; 161(11):786-792

Materials and methods

Principles of method if other than guideline:
The effects of 5 rates of Cu (0-200 mg/kg) amendment to a Candler fine sand (Typic Quartzipsamment) on root and shoot growth and concentrations of Cu in the respective plant parts of Cleopatra mandarin(CM) and Swingle citrumelo(SC) rootstock seedlings were evaluated at 3 pH levels ranging from pH 5 to 7.

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent

Test organisms

Species:
other: Cleopatra mandarin and Swingle citrumelo

Study design

Study type:
laboratory study
Substrate type:
natural soil

Results and discussion

Effect concentrationsopen allclose all
Species:
other: Cleopatra mandarin
Duration:
106 d
Dose descriptor:
other: added NOEC
Effect conc.:
100 - 200 mg/kg soil dw
Conc. based on:
element
Basis for effect:
other: shoot and root dry weight (No bioavailability correction possible as CEC is not given or can not be derived)
Remarks on result:
other: No bioavailability correction possible as CEC is not given or can not be derived
Species:
other: Swingle citrumelo
Duration:
106 d
Dose descriptor:
other: added NOEC
Effect conc.:
50 - 100 mg/kg soil dw
Conc. based on:
element
Basis for effect:
other: root dry weight (No bioavailability correction possible as CEC is not given or can not be derived)
Remarks on result:
other: No bioavailability correction possible as CEC is not given or can not be derived
Species:
other: Swingle citrumelo
Duration:
106 d
Dose descriptor:
other: added NOEC
Effect conc.:
> 200 mg/kg soil dw
Conc. based on:
element
Basis for effect:
other: shoot dry weight (No bioavailability correction possible as CEC is not given or can not be derived)
Remarks on result:
other: No bioavailability correction possible as CEC is not given or can not be derived

Any other information on results incl. tables

see Executive summary

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
Reliability: added NOEC values varied from 100 to more than 200 mg Cu/kg for Cleopatra mandarin shoot dry weight and root dry weight and for Swingle citrumelo root dry weight from 50 to 100 mg Cu/kg and was higher than 200 mgCu/kg for shoot dry weight.
No bioavailability correction possible as CEC is not given or can not be derived.
Executive summary:

The effects of 5 rates of Cu (0-200 mg/kg) amendment to a Candler fine sand (Typic Quartzipsamment) on root and shoot growth and concentrations of Cu in the respective plant parts of Cleopatra mandarin(CM) and Swingle citrumelo(SC) rootstock seedlings were evaluated at 3 pH levels ranging from pH 5 to 7. Rootstock, rate of Cu, and soil pH significantly influenced root and shoot dry weights (DW) and Cu concentration. Shoot dry weight of CM seedlings at pH 6 was 18% and 15% lower than that at pH 5 and 7, respectively. Shoot dry weight of SC seedlings at pH 6 was 18% lower than that at pH 7. Root dry weight of SC at pH 6 was 17% and 20% lower than that at pH 5 and 7, respectively. Shoot dry weight of CM in soil amended with 200 mg/kg Cu was lower by 21% compared with that of the seedlings in the soil without Cu amendment. The root dry weight was lower by 37% and 18%, respectively, for the CM and SC seedlings in the soil amended with 200 mg/kg of Cu compared with that in the soil that received no Cu. Concentrations of Cu in the roots of both rootstocks at all 3 pH levels showed a significant linear relationship with the soil Cu measured by Mehlich 3 (M3) extraction. However, the accumulation of Cu in the roots with an increase in M3 extractable soil Cu was greater at pH 6 than at pH 5 or 7. Furthermore, accumulation of Cu in the roots was greater in the CM compared with the SC seedling. The differential accumulation of Cu in the roots was proposed to be responsible, in part, for the greater tolerance of the CM rootstock to Cu toxicity when compared with the SC rootstock.