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Environmental fate & pathways

Adsorption / desorption

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Description of key information

-Aquatic compartment
Partition coefficient in freshwater suspended matter Kpsusp= 30,246 l/kg (log Kp (pm/w) = 4.48) (50thpercentile)
Partition coefficient in freshwater sediment Kpsed = 24,409 l/kg (log Kp(sed/w) = 4.39) (50th percentile)
Partition coefficient in estuarine suspended matter Kpsusp= 56,234 l/kg (log Kp (pm/w) = 4.75) (50thpercentile)
Partition coefficient in marine suspended matter Kpsusp= 131,826 l/kg (log Kp (pm/w) = 5.12) (50thpercentile)
-Terrestrial compartment
Partitioning coefficient Kd value soil: 2120 L/kg(log Kp (pm/w) = 3.33) (50thpercentile)

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Additional information

Relevant partitioning coefficients are available from literature.

- For the aquatic compartment, the summaries from Heijerick and Van Sprang (2005 and 2008) have been agreed under the copper RAR (2008) and are used the risk characterization.

- For the terrestrial compartments, in the RA report, preference has been given to the Sauvé et al dataset as it covers the widest range of soil conditions relevant for the risk assessment and these have been used for the risk characterization under the copper RAR (2008).

-Aquatic compartment

Partition coefficient in freshwater suspended matter       Kpsusp= 30,246 l/kg (log Kp (pm/w) = 4.48) (50thpercentile)

Partition coefficient in freshwater sediment                   Kpsed = 24,409 l/kg (log Kp(sed/w) = 4.39) (50th percentile)

Partition coefficient in estuarine suspended matter        Kpsusp= 56,234 l/kg (log Kp (pm/w) = 4.75) (50thpercentile)

Partition coefficient in marine suspended matter            Kpsusp= 131,826 l/kg (log Kp (pm/w) = 5.12) (50thpercentile)

-Terrestrial compartment

Partitioning coefficient                                                 Kd value soil: 2120 L/kg(log Kp (pm/w) = 3.33) (50thpercentile)

Information on short term and long term attenuation of copper in soils as a function of soil chemistry was assessed by Ma et al., 2006a & 2006b. The soil and environmental factors governing short term attenuation and ageing rates are soil pH, organic matter content, incubation time and temperature with soil pH being the key factor for ageing of Cu added to soils. 

From the field experiments and a mechanistic understanding of the decrease in bioavailable copper as a function of time following exposures, an ageing factor of 2 was derived as a reasonable worst case when considering field exposure data. This information is relevant to the soil PNEC derivation.