Registration Dossier

Administrative data

Link to relevant study record(s)

Description of key information

No toxicokinetic studies have been conducted on this substance.   The corrosive nature of the material precludes toxicokinetic testing due to animal welfare considerations.  However, similar substances such as Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) have been studied extensively. 
Absorption following dermal exposure to BADGE is low, with most of the dose (66%) remaining at the application site and/or its covering. Oral absorption of 14C-BADGE is high, but further studies indicate that the material is not stable in gastric fluid and is likely degraded either in the stomach or first-pass toxicokinetics through the liver. Metabolite profiles indicate rapid degradation by epoxide hydrolases in liver and lung, and comparative toxicokinetic studies indicate that human microsomes are more efficient in degrading BADGE than rodent microsomes.
Although this material has been demonstrated in QSAR assessments to contain no hydrolysable groups, the chemical structure indicates, similar to BADGE, the material is not stable in gastric fluid and is likely degraded either in the stomach or first-pass toxicokinetics through the liver.

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Additional information

No toxicokinetic studies have been conducted on this substance.  The corrosive nature of the material precludes toxicokinetic testing due to animal welfare considerations. However, similar substances such as Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) have been studied extensively.

Absorption following dermal exposure to BADGE is low, with most of the dose (66%) remaining at the application site and/or its covering. Oral absorption of14C-BADGE is high, but further studies indicate that the material is not stable in gastric fluid and is likely degraded either in the stomach or first-pass toxicokinetics through the liver. Metabolite profiles indicate rapid degradation by epoxide hydrolases in liver and lung, and comparative toxicokinetic studies indicate that human microsomes are more efficient in degrading BADGE than rodent microsomes.

 

Although this material has been demonstrated in QSAR assessments to contain no hydrolysable groups, the chemical structure indicates, similar to BADGE, the material is not stable in gastric fluid and is likely degraded either in the stomach or first-pass toxicokinetics through the liver.