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Environmental fate & pathways

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
other distribution data
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
other information
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Acceptable, well documented study report which meets basic scientific principles.

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Unnamed
Year:
1985

Materials and methods

Principles of method if other than guideline:
To determine the formation and fate of bound residues of 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene a field-like outdoor experiment with barley and cress plants was conducted.
GLP compliance:
not specified
Type of study:
other: distribution between soil and plants
Media:
soil - biota

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent
Details on test material:
- Name of test material (as cited in study report): 1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene
- Analytical purity: no data
- Test material: radiolabled [14C]1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene
- Radiochemical purity (if radiolabelling): no definite data => [14C]1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene was mixed with the inactive compound before adding to the soil

Results and discussion

Any other information on results incl. tables

soil depth

[cm]

distribution of bound residues in different soil layers, 126 days after treatment of soil with 1,2,4-TCB

[% of initial applied radioactivity]

0-5

0.23

5-10

0.17

10-20

0.38

20-30

0.37

30-40

0.24

Soil, total

1.39

The difference in concentration between the top soil and the lowest soil layer is not very great. For 1,2,4-Trichlorobenzen 71,2% of residues can be found below 10 cm. The formation of soil-bound residues in soil layers below the treated 0-10 cm top soil layer depends upon the migration rate of the parent compound, which in turn depends on its water solubility, and upon the formation rate of bound residues which is influenced by its biodegradability. It should be considered be considered that in top soil volatilization and total biodegradation to carbon dioxide may overcome leaching processes. In deeper soil layers, total biodegradation is also a competitive process so that a compound with lower water solubility and higher biological persistence (e.g. 1,2,4-TCB) may form higher levels of soil-bound residues in deeper soil layers than a nonpersistent compound with a higher water solubility.

 

soil depth

[cm]

bound residues in different soil layers, 126 days after treatment of soil with 1,2,4-TCB in relation to extractable residues

[% of total radioactivity of each sample]

0-5

23.0

5-10

19.3

10-20

28.5

20-30

35.0

30-40

38.0

The ratio between soluble and bound residues shows no marked differences between various soil depths.

Applicant's summary and conclusion