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Environmental fate & pathways

Bioaccumulation: terrestrial

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
bioaccumulation: terrestrial
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
other information
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Acceptable, well documented publication which meets basic scientific principles. For bioaccumulation in plants there is no current guideline on methods available to compare with.

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Unnamed
Year:
1989

Materials and methods

Principles of method if other than guideline:
In an Outdoor experiment simulating field conditions radiolabeled [14C]1,2,4-trochlorobenze was added to lysimeters of 60 x 60 x 70 cm filled with soil.
GLP compliance:
not specified

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent
Details on test material:
- Name of test material (as cited in study report): 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene
- Analytical purity: > 99%
Radiolabelling:
yes

Test organisms

Test organisms (species):
other: barley plants

Study design

Total exposure / uptake duration:
125 d

Test conditions

Nominal and measured concentrations:
nominal concentration: 2,02 mg/kg dry soil in a 10-cm depth

Results and discussion

Any other information on results incl. tables

Residue Concentration, Total14C Content and Bioaccumulation Factors of Radioactive 1,2,4-Trochlorobenzene in Barley Plants after Treatment of Soil with14C-Labeled Chlorinated Benzenes under Outdoor Conditions

time of exposure [days]

concentration of 14C [µg/g]

(µg calculated as parent compounds per g dry plant matter)

Total 14C [ng/plant]

(calculated as parent compounds)

bioaccumulation factor

(concentration of 14C, calculated as parent compounds, in dry plant matter, divided by concentration of 14C in dry soil)

11

9,3

188

36

32

2,0

363

16

70

0,35

926

5,8

124

0,23

747

4,3

When considering the time course of residues in the plants, it is obvious that the concentration of radioactive substances in dry plant matter, as well asbioaccumulation factors, decreased with time. This effect isdue to growth dilution, since the absolute amounts of radioactive substances in plants increased with time except for the days between 70 and 125. In this period, plant growing declines, and the loss of radioactive compounds by evapotranspiration probably exceeds further uptake from soil.

Applicant's summary and conclusion