Registration Dossier

Ecotoxicological information

Toxicity to terrestrial plants

Currently viewing:

Administrative data

Endpoint:
toxicity to terrestrial plants: long-term
Type of information:
migrated information: read-across from supporting substance (structural analogue or surrogate)
Adequacy of study:
disregarded due to major methodological deficiencies
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Scientifically acceptable publication, basic data given, peer reviewed data

Data source

Referenceopen allclose all

Reference Type:
publication
Title:
unknown
Author:
Bergmann,H. et al.
Year:
1991
Bibliographic source:
J.Agron.Crop Sci.166, 117-126, (1991)
Reference Type:
secondary source
Title:
SIDS Initial Assessment Profile for CAS No. 141-43-5 (DRAFT)
Author:
OECD
Year:
2001
Bibliographic source:
SIDS Initial Assessment Profile for CAS No. 141-43-5 (DRAFT)

Materials and methods

Principles of method if other than guideline:
Growth test on rye and barley.
GLP compliance:
no

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent
Details on test material:
Purity: 99 %

Test organisms

open allclose all
Species:
Hordeum vulgare
Plant group:
Monocotyledonae (monocots)
Species:
Secale cereale
Plant group:
Monocotyledonae (monocots)
Species:
Triticum aestivum
Plant group:
Monocotyledonae (monocots)

Study design

Test type:
other:
Study type:
laboratory study
Substrate type:
artificial soil

Test conditions

Details on test conditions:
TEST SYSTEM
All experiments were
performed in 4 replicates

Results and discussion

Effect concentrationsopen allclose all
Species:
Hordeum vulgare
Basis for effect:
other: increase in grain yield
Remarks on result:
other: increase in
Species:
Secale cereale
Basis for effect:
other: increase in grain yield
Species:
Triticum aestivum
Basis for effect:
growth
Remarks:
increase in grain yield

Any other information on results incl. tables

Monoethanolamine increased the grain yield of spring barley from 5% to 7%. A stimulating effect of monoethanolamine on the grain yield of winter wheat and winter rye was also obtained. The increase on the grain yield of spring barley was also reproducible under the conditions of the small plot. In the case of spring barley and winter rye the increase in grain yield was connected with a greater number of ear-bearing tillers. The increase of the winter wheat yield resulted from more grains per ear of the tillers. The enhanced formation of tiller grain mass and total tiller biomass by monoethanolamine was in correlation with a higher nitrogen import into tillers.

Applicant's summary and conclusion