Registration Dossier

Administrative data

Hazard for aquatic organisms

Freshwater

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC aqua (freshwater)
PNEC value:
1 mg/L
Assessment factor:
1 000
Extrapolation method:
assessment factor
PNEC freshwater (intermittent releases):
10 mg/L

Marine water

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC aqua (marine water)
PNEC value:
0.1 mg/L
Assessment factor:
10 000
Extrapolation method:
assessment factor

STP

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no emission to STP expected

Sediment (freshwater)

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC sediment (freshwater)
PNEC value:
0.996 mg/kg sediment dw
Extrapolation method:
equilibrium partitioning method

Sediment (marine water)

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC sediment (marine water)
PNEC value:
0.1 mg/kg sediment dw
Extrapolation method:
equilibrium partitioning method

Hazard for air

Air

Hazard assessment conclusion:
no hazard identified

Hazard for terrestrial organisms

Soil

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC soil
PNEC value:
0.291 mg/kg soil dw
Extrapolation method:
equilibrium partitioning method

Hazard for predators

Secondary poisoning

Hazard assessment conclusion:
PNEC oral
PNEC value:
16.667 mg/kg food
Assessment factor:
300

Additional information

The substance, based upon its molecular structure, cannot be completely mineralised by ready biodegradation. Indeed, the data available suggests that while some partial degradation of the long chain hydrocarbons may occur, the substance is highly stable in the presence of the mineral oil solvent and, being highly insoluble in water, is considered to be not prone to hydrolysis, although the limit of water solubility has prevented this from being demonstrated experimentally. On the basis of these factors, the substance is considered to be highly persistent in the aquatic and terrestrial environment.

Based on the data available, however, the substance is not toxic to any of the three trophic freshwater species tested. Due to the lack of toxicity observed in the freshwater acute toxicity studies, it is considered unlikely that the substance would be toxic to marine species.

The substance has also has an extremely high partition coefficient and is predicted to have a low BCF. It is therefore considered that the substance would not have the potential to bioaccumulate in the environment.

 

The hydrophobic nature of the substance and the presence of the mineral oil is, however, likely to lead to micelle formation at the surface of water. It is hypothesised that the ionic sulphonate head will be attracted to water while the hydrophilic tail will tend to the oil, which may have the effect of forming an emulsion which may, in turn, lower the surface tension of the water phase.

Based upon the persistence of the substance, the possible micelle formation and the oil based products with which the substance would be associated throughout its lifecycle, strict controls are in place at sites where the substance is produced, and where products containing the substance are formulated, to remove the substance from any water waters and collect all waste contaminated with the substance in closed systems for removal and destruction by incineration by a licensed waste disposal operator. Similar containment is also required of all industrial, professional and consumer users of products containing the substance for controlled disposal by licensed waste disposal operators or by local authorities as appropriate.

Conclusion on classification

On the basis of the data available and the known properties of the substance, it is considered that the substance does not trigger any of the requirements for environmental classification. The registered substance is therefore not classified.