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Physical & Chemical properties

Melting point / freezing point

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Reference
Endpoint:
melting point/freezing point
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
key study
Study period:
2015-08-10 to 2015-12-12
Reliability:
1 (reliable without restriction)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
guideline study
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
EU Method A.1 (Melting / Freezing Temperature)
Version / remarks:
(May 30th 2008)
Deviations:
no
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
OECD Guideline 102 (Melting point / Melting Range)
Version / remarks:
(adopted on 27 July 1995)
Deviations:
no
GLP compliance:
no
Type of method:
other: differential scanning calorimetry / visual methods (Capillary Method/Hotbench)
Decomp. temp.:
>= 190 °C
Remarks on result:
not determinable
Remarks:
No thermodynamic melting point could be identified up to beginning degradation at 190°C

Results

Capillary method / Hotbench

In the melt microscope an onset-temperature of 87 °C was observed where the specimen began to get liquid, at 98 °C the sample became fluid. At the Kofler Heizbank at 95 °C - 100 °C the test item lost its resin structure and appeared as an oily phase. Between 100°C and 190°C the oil became more and more thin. While applying the test item the formation of some minor gas bubbles (evaporation of residual water) was observed, however, a significant loss of substance by evaporation could not be determined. Above 190 °C a formation of smoke was observed, the colour of the test item got more and more dark.

DSC/TGA

An endothermic signal was recorded over a temperature range of -29 °C - 8 °C. No additional phase transition could be observed up to 190 °C. This endothermic is possibly attributed to a solid-solid phase transformation, however, a melting of crystalline subcomponents cannot be completely excluded. The recorded discontinuities above 150°C indicate a beginning decomposition of the test item which corresponds to the increased weight loss. For the visually observed liquefaction around 90 °C - 100 °C no corresponding signal indication a phase transition was recorded in the DSC tests.

Conclusions:
No thermodynamic melting point could be identified up to beginning degradation at 190 °C (1020 hPa). A sharp drop in viscosity from waxy solid to liquid (begin of fluidity) was observed in the range of 90 °C - 100 °C.
Executive summary:

The melting temperature of Amphopropionates C12 -18 (93.6% a.i.) was determined by differential scanning calorimetry an visual methods according to the OECD Test Guideline 102 (adopted on 27 July 1995) and EU test method A.1 (1995). No thermodynamic melting point could be identified up to beginning degradation at 190 °C (1020 hPa). A sharp drop in viscosity from waxy solid to liquid (begin of fluidity) was observed in the range of 87 °C - 100 °C.

Description of key information

no melting point identified (OECD TG 102 / EU method A.1; RL1; no GLP)

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Melting / freezing point at 101 325 Pa:
87 °C

Additional information

The melting temperature of Amphopropionates C12 -18 (93.6% a.i.) was determined by differential scanning calorimetry an visual methods according to OECD Test Guideline 102 (adopted on 27 July 1995) and EU test method A.1 (1995). No thermodynamic melting point could be identified up to beginning degradation at 190 °C (1020 hPa). A sharp drop in viscosity from waxy solid to liquid (begin of fluidity) was observed in the range of 87 °C - 100 °C. However, for the purpose of environmental exposure assessment, a key value of 87°C was used.