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Environmental fate & pathways

Biodegradation in soil

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
biodegradation in soil
Type of information:
not specified
Adequacy of study:
weight of evidence
Reliability:
4 (not assignable)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: 4a. Based on an abstract, publication not readily available.

Data source

Referenceopen allclose all

Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Simulation Studies of Degradation of Chemicals in the Environment Tokyo, Japan
Author:
Kondo M
Year:
1978
Bibliographic source:
Off of Health Stud Environ Agency (1978)
Reference Type:
review article or handbook
Title:
N-Methylaniline
Author:
Budavari S et al
Year:
1989
Bibliographic source:
The Merck Index 11th ed Rahway, NJ: Merck & Co Inc (1989)

Materials and methods

Principles of method if other than guideline:
No data on the guideline followed.
GLP compliance:
no
Test type:
laboratory

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent
Radiolabelling:
not specified

Study design

Oxygen conditions:
aerobic
Soil classification:
not specified

Results and discussion

% Degradation
Key result
Remarks on result:
not measured/tested
Transformation products:
not specified
Evaporation of parent compound:
not specified
Volatile metabolites:
not specified
Residues:
not specified

Any other information on results incl. tables

On the soil surface, N-Methylaniline potentially photodegrades or volatilizes (Kondo, 1978).

N-Methylaniline is easily oxidized (Budavari et al., 1989) and may thus react with natural oxidants in soil.

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
At the soil surface, N-methylaniline is subjected to photodegradation and volitalization, while in soil it may be readily oxidized.