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Toxicological information

Direct observations: clinical cases, poisoning incidents and other

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
direct observations: clinical cases, poisoning incidents and other
Type of information:
migrated information: read-across from supporting substance (structural analogue or surrogate)
Adequacy of study:
weight of evidence
Reliability:
4 (not assignable)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Provided for informational purposes.
Cross-referenceopen allclose all
Reason / purpose:
reference to same study
Reason / purpose:
reference to other study

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Asthma induced by nickel.
Author:
Block, G.T. and M. Yeung.
Year:
1982
Bibliographic source:
JAMA. 247(11):1600-1602.

Materials and methods

Study type:
clinical case study
Endpoint addressed:
respiratory sensitisation
Test guideline
Qualifier:
no guideline followed
GLP compliance:
not specified

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent

Method

Type of population:
occupational
Subjects:
TEST SUBJECT: 60-year old metal polisher, former smoker, history of contact dermatitis, recent episodes of shortness of breath, and no history of allergies. Asthma symptoms encountered included repeated episodes of dyspnea, wheezing, and cough. His job consisted of grinding surface irregularities on the nickel surface of bumpers. The patient generally wore gloves, but rarely wore a mask.
Ethical approval:
not specified
Route of exposure:
inhalation
Reason of exposure:
unintentional, occupational
Exposure assessment:
not specified
Details on exposure:
not reported
Examinations:
Prick tests were conducted with various common allergens, as well as nickel sulfate solutions prepared in sterile distilled water at
concentrations of 0.1, 1, 10, and 100 mg/ml. Distilled water was used as a control. Other tests conducted included scratch/intradermal tests,
patch tests, in vitro erythrocyte tests, immunological tests, and inhalation tests. A person with asthma, but no history of nickel exposure, was used as a control subject.
Medical treatment:
none

Results and discussion

Clinical signs:
Asthma symptoms encountered included repeated episodes of dyspnea, wheezing, and cough.
Results of examinations:
The patient had a positive reaction during skin prick tests to nickel sulphate at 100 mg/ml (the control was negative). The patient's patch test was negative and he had no reaction to any of the common allergens tested. There was an immediate response to workplace dust after exposure for 8 minutes, and an immediate reaction to nickel sulfate in bronchoprovocation tests. Methacholine inhalation tests showed increased bronchial activity before specific challenge.
Outcome of incidence:
The authors reported that the patient's asthma was due to exposure to nickel in the workplace.

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Executive summary:

STUDY RATED BY AN INDEPENDENT REVIEWER.