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Toxicological information

Direct observations: clinical cases, poisoning incidents and other

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
direct observations: clinical cases, poisoning incidents and other
Type of information:
other: case study
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Well-described and detailed case study

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Reversible Hepatotoxic Effects of Diphenyl: Report of a Case and a Review of the Literature
Author:
Carella G, Bettolo PM
Year:
1994
Bibliographic source:
Journal of Occupational Medicine 36, 575-576

Materials and methods

Study type:
clinical case study
Endpoint addressed:
repeated dose toxicity: oral
repeated dose toxicity: dermal
Test guideline
Qualifier:
no guideline required
GLP compliance:
no

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent
Details on test material:
Patient was exposed to diphenyl-impregnated paper.

Method

Subjects:
- Number of subjects exposed: 1
- Sex: female
- Age: 46
- Demographic information: Italy
- Other: no alcohol or drug abuse or taken hepatotoxic medication, no transfusions, no multiple sexual partners
Route of exposure:
dermal
oral
Reason of exposure:
unintentional, occupational
Exposure assessment:
not specified

Results and discussion

Clinical signs:
General clinical condition was good.
Moderate hepatomegaly was noted and confirmed by ultrasound. Elevation in serum transaminases, alkaline phosphatase, GGT and neutrophilic leukocytosis. Hepatitis B markers were negative. A liver biopsy showed a polymorphic inflammatory infiltrate with some eosinophils in the portal and lobular regions consistent with the picture of chronic persistent hepatitis. In the past, the patient had reported episodes of periodic asthenia accompanied by a rise in transaminases.
Approximately 3 years earlier the patient had stopped working in citrus packing and all symptoms had returned to normal.

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
The pathogenesis of liver damage in the patient can be attributed to both skin absorption of diphenyl due to prolonged contact with the packing paper and perhaps also to digestive absorption.