Registration Dossier

Environmental fate & pathways

Field studies

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
field studies
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Study period:
1997-1998 and 1998-1999
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Peer reviewed article from a moderate's impact factor journal. The methodology is scientifically acceptable and the report is sufficiently well documented.
Cross-reference
Reason / purpose for cross-reference:
reference to other study

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
The fate and persistence of trifluoroacetic and chloroacetic acids in pond waters.
Author:
David A. Ellis, Mark L. Hanson, Paul K. Sibley, Tazeen Shahid, Neil A. Fineberg, Keith R. Solomon, Derek C.G. Muir, Scott A. Mabury
Year:
2001
Bibliographic source:
Chemosphere 42: 309-318

Materials and methods

Principles of method if other than guideline:
Study on the degradation of TCA and TFA in field aquatic microcosms and laboratory sediment water systems. Analysis by GC/MS after derivatization and ion chromatography. (QA/QC: blanks and LOD=not reported). Calculation of half-lives for some halo acetic acids but not for TFA which did not degraded in the experiment time of 1 year and proposed degradation pathway (microbial degradation in water media for the studied halo acetic acids).
GLP compliance:
not specified
Type of measurement:
Study on the degradation of TCA and TFA in field (outdoor microsoms) and laboratory (sediment water system) experiments. Analysis by GC/MS after derivatization and ion chromatography (QA/QC: blanks and LOD=not reported).
Media:
freshwater and sediment

Test material

Constituent 1
Reference substance name:
TFA
IUPAC Name:
TFA
Details on test material:
No data

Results and discussion

Any other information on results incl. tables

No degradation of TFA was observed in the time scale of the laboratory (2880h) and field (up to one year) experiments.

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
No degradation of TFA was observed in the time scale of the laboratory (2880h) and field (up to one year) experiments.
Executive summary:

The environmental fate of trichloro-, dichloro-, and monochloroacetic acids, and trifluoroacetic acid was investigated using field aquatic microcosms and laboratory sediment water systems from Canada. Trifluoroacetic acid was extremely persistent and showed no degradation during one-year field studies, though is appeared to undergo transient partitioning within an unknown pond phase as the temperature of the surroundings was reduced. The laboratory microsom experiments were also extended to TFA (up to 2880h) and no degradation was observed. Of the three chloroacetic acids, trichloro had the longest residence time (induction and decay) (40d), dichloro the shortest (4d), and monochloro an intermediate residence time (14d). Laboratory studies suggest that the biodegradation of trichloro-, dichloro-, and monochloroacetic acids leads primarily to the formation of chloride and oxalic, glyoxalic, and glycolic acids, respectively.