Registration Dossier

Environmental fate & pathways

Monitoring data

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
monitoring data
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Study period:
no data
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Peer review study. The methodology is scientifically acceptable and the report is sufficiently well documented.

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Unnamed
Year:
1998

Materials and methods

Principles of method if other than guideline:
TFA was detected and measured in fog, rain, snow and surface water obtained in 1994 -1996 from several locations in California and Nevada.
GLP compliance:
not specified
Type of measurement:
background concentration
Media:
other: fog, rain, snow and surface water

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent
Details on test material:
None

Results and discussion

Any other information on results incl. tables

Fog and rain samples contained 31 - 3779 ng/L TFA. Snow samples taken in more remote areas had 51 - 584 ng/L. Surface water varied from 55 ng/L - 41 µg/L depending on type and location. Washout of TFA from the lower atmosphere was observed in both rain and fog samples. There was a trend toward decreasing TFA in precipitation samples taken at later stages during a single storm event, indicating cleansing of TFA from the lower atmosphere by precipitation.

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
Fog and rain samples contained 31 - 3779 ng/L TFA. Snow samples taken in more remote areas had 51 - 584 ng/L. Surface water varied from 55 ng/L - 41 µg/L depending on type and location. Washout of TFA from the lower atmosphere was observed in both rain and fog samples. There was a trend toward decreasing TFA in precipitation samples taken at later stages during a single storm event, indicating cleansing of TFA from the lower atmosphere by precipitation.
Executive summary:

TFA was detected and measured in fog, rain, snow and surface water obtained in 1994 -1996 from several locations in California and Nevada. Fog and rain samples contained 31 - 3779 ng/L TFA. Snow samples taken in more remote areas had 51 - 584 ng/L. Surface water varied from 55 ng/L - 41 µg/L depending on type and location. Washout of TFA from the lower atmosphere was observed in both rain and fog samples. There was a trend toward decreasing TFA in precipitation samples taken at later stages during a single storm event, indicating cleansing of TFA from the lower atmosphere by precipitation. The magnitude of TFA levels suggest that formation in the environment from HCFC and HFC degradation is occurring more rapidly than expected, or that alternate sources of TFA exist.