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Ecotoxicological information

Toxicity to terrestrial arthropods

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Description of key information

Since dipotassium hexafluorotitanate rapidly dissociates into fluoride, potassium and titanium ions upon dissolution in the environment, and only fluoride but not titanium ions will remain in solution, it can be assumed that toxicity (if any) will be driven by the fluoride anion. Therefore, the NOEC of 800 mg F/kg for the long-term (126 days) toxicity of sodium fluoride to Porcellio scaber is read-across resulting in a NOEC of 1685.0 mg/kg for dipotassium hexafluorotitanate.

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Long-term EC10, LC10 or NOEC for soil dwelling arthropods:
1 685 mg/kg soil dw

Additional information

Dipotassium hexafluorotitanate

Since dipotassium hexafluorotitanate rapidly dissociates into fluoride, potassium and titanium ions upon dissolution in the environment, and only fluoride but not titanium ions will remain in solution, it can be assumed that toxicity (if any) will be driven by the fluoride anion. Therefore, full read-across of soil toxicity data of potassium fluoride (CAS #7789-23-3) and other fluorides based upon a molecular weight conversion is justified (see below).

 

Potassium fluoride

The effects of fluoride concentration were investigated on the numbers of Porcellio scaber in leaf litter. Leaf litter was collected from eight sites at various distances away from an aluminium reduction plant. Results showed that litter collected far from the plant had a lower fibre content, was more sapric and was less acid. Total acid extractable fluoride in the litter and upper 15 cm of soil was about 41 times as much at the closest site (700 mg/kg) as at the most distant sites (12 and 16 mg/kg). In a bioassay of litter from study sites, woodlice (Porcellio scaber) had an abnormally high mortality in litter that contained 440 mg/kg or more of acid extractable fluoride. When fluoride was added in the form of NaF to the litter, a significant increase in mortality was observed only in treatments exceeding 800 mg/kg (Beyer et al, 1987).