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Administrative data

Link to relevant study record(s)

Reference
Endpoint:
oxidising solids
Type of information:
other: Expert statement
Adequacy of study:
key study
Reliability:
1 (reliable without restriction)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
test procedure in accordance with generally accepted scientific standards and described in sufficient detail
Remarks:
Functional groups of tin disulfide were considered in the assessment.
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
EU Method A.17 (Oxidising Properties (Solids))
GLP compliance:
no
Key result
Sample tested:
other: Assessment based on structure
Parameter:
other: oxidative properties
Remarks on result:
other: assessment based on structuire of the registered substance

According to the chemical structure and the additional classification considerations given in the in the Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008 (CLP) Chapter 2.13.4. it can be excluded beyond reasonable doubt that tin disulfate has oxidising properties.

Oxidizing materials are either liquids or solids that readily give off oxygen or other oxidizing substances (such as bromine, chlorine, or fluorine). They also include materials that react chemically to oxidize combustible (burnable) materials; this means that oxygen combines chemically with the

other material in a way that increases the chance of a fire or explosion or at least it causes an acceleration of burning. The reaction may be spontaneous at either room temperature or may occur under slight heating. Oxidizing materials can be severe fire and explosion hazards.

Examples for groups of common oxidizing materials:

bromine

bromates

chlorates

chromates

dichromates

hydroperoxides

hypochlorites

inorganic peroxides

ketone peroxides

nitrates

nitric acid

nitrites

perborates

perchlorates

perchloric acid

permanganates

peroxides

peroxyacids

persulfates

The property of a substance to act as a fire accelerating oxidator is therefore dependent on the ability to oxidize combustible materials and herewith to react exothermically.

Tin disulfide (Tin (IV) sulfide, SnS2) is not capable to act as an oxidizing substance. Sulfur itself is not an oxidizer but is oxidizable itself (e.g. Sulfur dioxide or Sulfur trioxide). If the SnS2, for example, decomposed due to a fire, oxidation of the Sulfur would clearly take place in all probability.

Interpretation of results:
GHS criteria not met
Conclusions:
Tin disulfide has no oxidizing properties.
Executive summary:

According to the chemical structure and the additional classification considerations given in the in the Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008 (CLP) Chapter 2.13.4. it can be excluded beyond reasonable doubt that tin disulfide has oxidising properties.

Description of key information

Tin disulfide has no oxidizing properties.

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Oxidising properties:
no

Additional information

According to the chemical structure and the additional classification considerations given in the in the Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008 (CLP) Chapter 2.13.4. it can be excluded beyond reasonable doubt that tin disulfide has oxidising properties.

Tin disulfide is not capable to act as an oxidizing substance. Sulfur itself is not an oxidizer but is oxidizable itself (e.g. Sulfur dioxide or Sulfur trioxide). If the SnS2, for example, decomposed due to a fire, oxidation of the Sulfur would take place.

Justification for classification or non-classification

According to the chemical structure and the additional classification considerations given in the in the Regulation (EC) No 1272/2008 (CLP) Chapter 2.13.4. it can be excluded beyond reasonable doubt that tin disulfide has oxidising properties.

Therefore, classification and labelling are not needed.