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Toxicological information

Basic toxicokinetics

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Administrative data

Endpoint:
basic toxicokinetics in vivo
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Restrictions - no claims that the study had been conducted and reported according to internationally accepted guidelines or in compliance with the principles of GLP. Results appear to be lacking detailed statistical analysis.

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Plasma Uptake of Manganese - Influence of Dietary factors.
Author:
Bales CW, Freeland-Graves JH, Lin PH, Stone JM and Dougherty V
Year:
1987
Bibliographic source:
American Chemical Society, Washington DC

Materials and methods

Objective of study:
absorption
Test guideline
Qualifier:
no guideline followed
Principles of method if other than guideline:
The influence of three dietary factors pectin, cellulose and phytates-on plasma uptake of manganese (Mn) was studied in adults administered Mn tolerance tests. Plasma samples were collected at hourly intervals following administration of various doses of several Mn salts
GLP compliance:
no

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent

Test animals

Species:
human
Sex:
male/female

Administration / exposure

Route of administration:
oral: unspecified
Vehicle:
not specified
Doses / concentrations
Remarks:
Doses / Concentrations:
50mg
No. of animals per sex per dose:
5 females and 6 males
Control animals:
yes, concurrent no treatment
Details on dosing and sampling:
PHARMACOKINETIC STUDY (Absorption, distribution, excretion)
- Tissues and body fluids sampled: Plasma
- Time and frequency of sampling: Fasting periods and oral dosing

Results and discussion

Any other information on results incl. tables

It was found that a 50 mg dose of Mn in the form of MnCl2 or MnSO4 resulted in a higher plasma concentration of Mn than MnSO4 within 4 hours of the dose, which results in the conclusion that MnCl2 is more efficiently absorbed than MnSO4.

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
Interpretation of results: bioaccumulation potential cannot be judged based on study results
MnCl2 is absorbed more efficiently than MnSO4 on the basis of much higher plasma concentrations of Mn after oral dose of 50 mg Mn in the form of either MnCl2 or MnSO4. This study would predict potentially greater adverse effects of oral consumption of MnCl2 compared to MnSO4.