Registration Dossier

Environmental fate & pathways

Endpoint summary

Administrative data

Description of key information

Additional information

Stability

If released to air, a vapor pressure of 2.5X10-3 mm Hg at 25 deg C indicates triethylene glycol monobutyl ether or (2-(2-(2-butoxyethoxy)ethoxy)ethanol) will exist solely as a vapor in the atmosphere. Vapor-phase triethylene glycol monobutyl ether or (2-(2-(2-butoxyethoxy)ethoxy)ethanol) will be degraded in the atmosphere by reaction with photochemically-produced hydroxyl radicals; the half-life for this reaction in air is estimated to be 7.5 hours.

 Alcohols and ethers do not contain chromophores that absorb at wavelengths >290 nm and therefore triethylene glycol monobutyl ether or (2-(2-(2-butoxyethoxy)ethoxy)ethanol) is not expected to be susceptible to direct photolysis by sunlight.

 

 If released to soil,triethylene glycol monobutyl ether or (2-(2-(2-butoxyethoxy)ethoxy)ethanol) is expected to have very high mobility based upon an estimated Koc of 10. Volatilization from moist soil surfaces is not expected to be an important fate process based upon an estimated Henry's Law constant of 9.5X10-14 atm-cu m/mole. Based on %theoretical BODS of 0-24 in 5-20 days, triethylene glycol monobutyl ether or (2-(2-(2-butoxyethoxy)ethoxy)ethanol) is expected to biodegrade slowly in soil and water.

 

If released into water, triethylene glycol monobutyl ether or(2-(2-(2-butoxyethoxy)ethoxy)ethanol) is not expected to adsorb to suspended solids and sediment based upon the estimated Koc. Volatilization from water surfaces is not expected to be an important fate process based upon this compound's estimated Henry's Law constant.

Hydrolysis is not expected to be an important environmental fate process since this compound lacks functional groups that hydrolyze under environmental conditions.

This substance is not expected to hydrolyze readily. No hydrolysis studies could be located, and the EPIWIN/HYDROWIN model cannot predict hydrolysis rates for the ether function [R-O-R, where R=organic alkyl group]. However, ether groups are generally stable to water under neutral conditions and ambient temperatures. The ether function is hydrolyzed by heating in the

presence of halogen acids, particularly hydrogen iodide (Fieser and Fieser, 1960).