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Environmental fate & pathways

Hydrolysis

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Endpoint:
hydrolysis
Type of information:
other: review article
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Study period:
Not reported
Reliability:
4 (not assignable)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: The reference does not give sufficient experimental details and refers to secondary literature.
Qualifier:
no guideline followed
Principles of method if other than guideline:
Not reported.
GLP compliance:
not specified

Tantalum is quite chemically stable, oxidising in air at 300 ºC and has excellent corrosion resistance, being attacked only by strong acids and alkalis, especially salts which can hydrolyse to form hydrofluoric acid.

No further data on results available.

Conclusions:
Tantalum was reported to be quite chemically stable, oxidising in air at 300 °C and having excellent corrosion resistance, being attacked only by strong acids and alkalis, especially salts which can hydrolyse to form hydrofluoric acid.
Executive summary:

Tantalum was reported to be quite chemically stable, oxidising in air at 300 ºC and having excellent corrosion resistance, being attacked only by strong acids and alkalis, especially salts which can hydrolyse to form hydrofluoric acid.

Endpoint:
hydrolysis
Data waiving:
other justification
Justification for data waiving:
the study does not need to be conducted because the substance is highly insoluble in water

Description of key information

Hydrolysis is not expected to occur since tantalum metal is highly insoluble in water, see section 4.8. As supporting study a review paper confirms that tantalum is chemically stable in water.

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Additional information

The substance is highly insoluble, hence hydrolysis is not expected to occur. Information from Black (1994) substantiates this; tantalum was reported to be quite chemically stable, oxidising in air at 300 °C and having excellent corrosion resistance, being attacked only by strong acids and alkalis, especially salts which can hydrolyse to form hydrofluoric acid.