Registration Dossier

Administrative data

Description of key information

Despite the extremely poor information in the literature available, it should be assumed that the absorptive-toxic potential of cyanogen chloride will be little different from that of hydrogen cyanide. Animal data Chronic Exposure or Carcinogenicity (EPA's Oral RfD) for chlorine cyanide is based in part on a chronic toxicity study in rats conducted by Howard and Hanzal in 1955. In this 2 -year dietary study, rats (10/sex/group) were administered food fumigated with hydrogen cyanide. The average daily concentrations were 73 and 183 mg CN/kg diet. From the data reported on food consumption and body weight, daily estimated doses were 4.3 mg and 10.8 mg CN/kg bw. The average food CN concentrations were estimated based on the authors' data for concentration at the beginning and end of each food preparation period and by assuming a first-order rate of loss for the intervening period. There were no treatment-related effects on growth rate, no gross signs of toxicity, and no histopathological lesions [1]. Human data Ten workers inhalatively exposed to non-quantified chlorocyan doses for long time periods suffered from muscular weakness, weariness, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, urge to urinate, cough, irritation to the skin, chronic headache, feeling of cold and loss of weight. An increased incidence of conjunctivitis and eyelid edema was registered. In a subacute inhalative experiment on dogs exposed to sublethal concentrations (no details given) daily for between 30 min and 2 hours, the following symptoms were reported: severe irritation to the eyes and upper airways, cramps, increased respiratory and heart frequency, vomiting, diarrhoea and severe weight loss. The pathological anatomical examination carried out later revealed congestion in the lung [2]. There is also distinct irritative action to the mucous membranes even at low concentrations.

Due to the age of the study and the methodology used, the test was considered to be not reliable and therefore inappropriate for classification and labelling.

References:

[1] U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) on Chlorine Cyanide (506-77-4).

[2] DFG: Toxikologisch-arbeitsmedizinische Begründungen von MAK-Werten; Verlag Chemie

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Repeated dose toxicity: via oral route - systemic effects

Endpoint conclusion
Endpoint conclusion:
adverse effect observed

Repeated dose toxicity: inhalation - systemic effects

Endpoint conclusion
Endpoint conclusion:
no study available

Repeated dose toxicity: inhalation - local effects

Endpoint conclusion
Endpoint conclusion:
no study available

Repeated dose toxicity: dermal - systemic effects

Endpoint conclusion
Endpoint conclusion:
no study available

Repeated dose toxicity: dermal - local effects

Endpoint conclusion
Endpoint conclusion:
no study available

Additional information

Justification for classification or non-classification

Based on the data available for this endpoint, the substance is not classified or labeled according to Regulation 1272/2008/EC (CLP)