Registration Dossier

Administrative data

Description of key information

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Skin irritation / corrosion

Endpoint conclusion
Endpoint conclusion:
adverse effect observed (irritating)

Eye irritation

Endpoint conclusion
Endpoint conclusion:
adverse effect observed (irritating)

Respiratory irritation

Endpoint conclusion
Endpoint conclusion:
adverse effect observed (irritating)

Additional information

From the "BUA Stoffbericht"

Monochloroacetone is a potent tear gas. In humans, monochloroacetone causes irritation of the eyes and upper respiratory tract. Skin contact causes painful blistering. In animal experiments, lung edema and hydrothorax were observed after inhalation exposure.

From HSDB database:

Animal data:

Chlroacetone gives off heavy vapors ... it causes much lacrimation @ concn of 5 to 8 ppm in air, & @ higher concn causes clouding of cornea which has not been described in detail. concn of 26 ppm in air is intolerable for more than a min because of severe irritation of all mucous membranes.

[grant, w.m. toxicology of the eye. 3rd ed., il: charles c. thomas publisher, 1986., p. 207] **peer reviewed**

 

dermal application of chloracetone to stock mice in 183 days had no tumorigenic effects, but 24 applications to albino mice, 0.2 ml, 0.3% in acetone (promotion with croton oil, 0.2 ml, 0.3% in acetone, 20 wk), in 365 days resulted in 44/19 papillomas, 10/20 papillomas in controls. /from table/

[searle, c. e. (ed.). chemical carcinogens. acs monograph 173., dc: american chemical society, 1976., p. 160] **peer reviewed**

 

 

Human experience:

the vapor of this liquid is a strong lacrimator & is irritating to skin & respiratory tract. concn of 0.018 mg/l is sufficient to produce lacrimation & concn of 0.11 mg/l will normally not be tolerated for more than 1 min.
[international labour office. encyclopedia of occupational health and safety. vols. i&ii.,: international labour office, 1983., p. 39] **peer reviewed**

... chloroacetone was extremely effective as a war gas. ... a concn of 2.3 mg/l (605 ppm) was found to be lethal after 10 min and 0.1 mg/l (26 ppm) is intolerable after one min of exposure. ... the effect ... is ... irritation of the upper resp tract and a burning sensation on exposed skin. ... most serious effects, such as pulmonary edema, do not occur at these low irritating concn. even small amt in the eyes may result in permanent damage.
[american conference of governmental industrial hygienists, inc. documentation of the threshold limit values and biological exposure indices. 6th ed. volumes i, ii, iii. cincinnati, oh: acgih, 1991., p. 262] **peer reviewed**

an employee that received direct exposure to hot chloroacetone required hospitalization; the fumes were immediately irritating to the eyes and upper resp tract, and the hot liq was immediately irritating to the skin. the immediate erythema appeared to subside; however, about 8 hr after exposure, the exposed areas began to blister, and 24 hr post exposure the exposed area had blistered completely. all signs and symptoms disappeared within 7 days, and there was no evidence of pulmonary edema despite irritation to the upper resp tract.
[american conference of governmental industrial hygienists, inc. documentation of the threshold limit values and biological exposure indices. 6th ed. volumes i, ii, iii., oh: acgih, 1991., p. 262] **peer reviewed**

human experience with chloroacetone is limited ... because of the highly irritating nature of the chemical.
[american conference of governmental industrial hygienists, inc. documentation of the threshold limit values and biological exposure indices. 6th ed. volumes i, ii, iii., oh: acgih, 1991., p. 262] **peer reviewed**

... the first experienced effect is lacrimation ... followed by irritation of the upper respiratory tract and a burning sensation on exposed skin. ... even small amounts in the eyes may result in permanent damage.
[american conference of governmental industrial hygienists, inc. documentation of the threshold limit values and biological exposure indices. 6th ed. volumes i, ii, iii., oh: acgih, 1991., p. 262] **peer reviewed**

Effects on skin irritation/corrosion: irritating

Effects on eye irritation: irritating

Effects on respiratory irritation: irritating

Justification for classification or non-classification