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Description of key information

No experimental data on sodium acrylate are available. Data on the structural analogue acrylic acid are included for assessment. Acrylic acid showed no evidence of carcinogenicity or toxicity in a 2-year drinking water study in Wistar rats up to the highest dose tested of 78 mg/kg bw/day. Taking into account the higher molecular weight of sodium acrylate (94.0445 g/mol) as compared to acrylic acid (72.06 g/mol), this corresponds to a NOAEL for general toxicity and carcinogenicity of 102 mg/kg bw, respectively.

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Additional information

No experimental data on sodium acrylate are available. Data on the structural analogue acrylic acid are included for assessment.

 

 

In a valid carcinogenicity study according to OECD TG 451 (BASF AG, 1989; Hellwig et al., 1993) Wistar rats were administered doses of 120, 400 or 1200 ppm (corresponding to approx. 8, 27, and 78 mg/kg bw/d, respectively) acrylic acid (purity: 99 %, stabilized with 200 ppm hydroquinone monomethylether) in drinking water for 26 months (males) or 28 months (females). Except for a slightly reduced water consumption in high-dose males and females no treatment-related clinical or hematological changes were detected in comparison with the controls. The extensive histopathological examination of the preserved tissues revealed that in all three treatment groups, the non-neoplastic tissue changes did not differ from those of the controls. The incidence and organ distribution of tumours found in the groups treated with acrylic acid was not significantly different from those of the controls.

 

 

 

Conclusion

 

There is no evidence that acrylic acid administered orally to rats is carcinogenic.

 

Based on the structural similiarites of acrylic acid and sodium acrylate it is concluded that sodium acrylate does not have a carcinogenic potential.

Justification for classification or non-classification

EU classification according to Annex VI of Directive 67/548/EEC: no classification required

GHS classification (GHS UN rev.3, 2009): no classification required