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No experimental data on sodium acrylate are available. Data on the structural analogue acrylic acid which has been extensively studied using in-vitro and in-vivo tests, are included. Due to the differing vapour pressure of the two substances, only studies by the oral route can be considered for the assessment of the toxicokinetic behaviour and metabolism of sodium acrylate in mammals.

 

 

Following oral administration of [14C]-Acrylic acid in rats and mice, a high percentage of the radiolabel (60 – 80 %) was rapidly absorbed and eliminated as14CO2within 24 hours by both species. Excretion in urine and faeces accounted for 1-4 %, respectively. In rats, about 19-25 % of the acrylic acid-derived radioactivity remained in the tissues examined after 72 hr, mostly in adipose tissue and muscle. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of rat urine and rat and mouse tissues indicated that absorbed AA was rapidly metabolized by the ß-oxidation pathway of propionate catabolism. No unchanged AA was detected; however, several metabolites that were more polar than AA were measured, including 3-hydroxypropionate.

 

The presented results are consistent with the incorporation of AA into a secondary pathway for propionic acid metabolism in which 3 -hydroxypropionate is an intermediate. In this pathway, AA is first converted to acrylyl-CoA which is subsequently oxidized to 3 -hydroxypropionate. 3 -Hydroxypropionate is, in turn, metabolized to acetate and CO2via malonic semialdehyde. The resultant acetate is then incorporated into intermediary metabolism. This pathway has been reported to be a major pathway for the metabolism of propionic acid in various insect and plant species, but is a secondary pathway in mammals.

On the other hand, reaction with reduced glutathion does not play a major role in the detoxification and metabolism of acrylic acid.

Discussion on bioaccumulation potential result:

No experimental data on sodium acrylate are available. Data on the structural analogue acrylic acid which has been extensively studied using in-vitro and in-vivo tests, are included. Due to the differing vapour pressure of the two substances, only studies by the oral route can be considered for the assessment of the basic toxicokinetic behaviour of sodium acrylate in mammals.

 

 

In Vivo Studies:

 

C3H mice and Fischer 344 rats, respectively, were treated by gavage (40 or 150 mg/kg bw) with [1-14C]-acrylic acid. Mice rapidly absorbed and metabolised orally administered acrylic acid, with about 80% of the dose exhaled as14CO2within 24 h. Excretion in urine and faeces accounted for approximately 3% and 1% of the dose, respectively. Elimination of the14C radiolabel from plasma, liver and kidney was rapid but it was slower from fat. The disposition of orally administered acrylic acid in rats was similar to the results obtained from mice. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of rat urine and rat and mouse tissues indicated that absorbed AA was rapidly metabolized by the ß-oxidation pathway of propionate catabolism. No unchanged AA was detected 1 h after oral administration; however, several metabolites that were more polar than AA were measured, including 3-hydroxypropionate. Neither AA nor its metabolites were detected at later times after oral administration (Black et al., 1995).

 

Sprague-Dawley rats received single oral doses of [2,3-14C]-acrylic acid (4, 40 or 400 mg/kg bw in a 0.5 % aqueous methylcellulose solution). Within 8 hours, 35-60% of the dose was eliminated from the animal, mostly as expired CO2. After 72 hours, 44-65% of the radioactivity had been eliminated via expired air, while 2.9-4.3% remained in urine, 2.4-3.6% in faeces and 18.9-24.6% in tissues examined (adipose tissue 9-15%, liver 1.7-2.2%, muscle 6.5-7.5% and blood 0.8-1.1%) (De Bethizy et al., 1987).

The HPLC profile of metabolites observed in the urine of rats indicated two major metabolites. One of the major metabolites co-eluted with 3-hydroxypropionic acid. Radioactivity could not be detected at the retention times corresponding to that of 2,3-epoxypropionic acid or N-acetyl-S-(2-carboxy-2-hydroxyethyl)cysteine leading to the conclusion that AA is not epoxidized to 2,3-epoxypropionic acid in vivo. This result was supported by an in vitro study. Hepatic microsomes were prepared using conventional methods from rats and incubations were started by the addition of 10 µL of [2,3-14C]-acrylic acid. No epoxidized metabolites could be detected and the parent compound was recovered from the incubation mixture unchanged (DeBethizy et al., 1987).

In addition, Glutathione Depletion Studies were conducted in rats that were administered doses of 4, 40, 400 or 1000 mg/kg bw AA by gavage.One hour following oral administration of acrylic acid in rats a significant depletion of NPSH in the glandular stomach was reported at doses above 4 mg/kg bw. In the forestomach NPSH depletion occurred at a dose of 1000 mg/kg bw. No significant effect of acrylic acid on NPSH in the blood or liver was observed (DeBethizy et al., 1987).

 

In Vitro Studies:

 

Dow Chemical (1979) have studied the metabolism of acrylic acid in rat tissue homogenates. Acrylic acid did not react with reduced glutathione either in the presence or absence of the soluble enzyme fraction. Non-protein sulfhydryl concentrations were not appreciably lower in blood after addition of acrylic acid in vitro (Dow Chemical, 1979; Miller et al., 1981).

 

The rate of14CO2formation from [14C]-acrylic acid was measured in vitro with preparations from rat liver hepatocytes. Rapid oxidation of acrylic acid to CO2was observed. Mitochondria isolated from the liver homogenates were incubated with acrylic acid under the same conditions and yielded higher rates of acrylic acid-oxidation than homogenates. HPLC analysis of the mitochondrial incubation mixtures indicated 3-hydroxypropionic acid as a major metabolite of AA (Finch & Frederick, 1992).

 

Black et al. (1993) determined the rate of the in vitro oxidation of acrylic acid in 13 tissues of mice. The maximal rate of acrylic acid oxidation in kidney, liver and skin was 2890, 616 and 48 nmol/h/g, respectively. In remaining organs acrylic acid was oxidized at rates less than 40% of the rate in liver. 3-Hydroxypropionic acid was the only metabolite detected by HPLC analysis.

Acrylic acid oxidation rates and blood tissue partition coefficients were studied in slices of rat tissue using [1-14C]-acrylic acid. Acrylic acid oxidation in rat kidney and liver slices was described by saturable kinetics with maximal rates of about 4 and 2 μmol/h/g, respectively. Acrylic acid oxidation rates in 11 additional tissues were 40% or less than that in liver (Black & Finch, 1995).

Discussion on absorption rate:

No experimental data on sodium acrylate are available. Data on the structural analogue acrylic acid are included. Dermal absorption of sodium acrylate will probably be comparable or lower than absorption of acrylic acid. Thus, the read across represents a worst case scenario and is therefore acceptable for the hazard assessment of the substance.

 

The absorption of [14C]-acrylic acid from acetone, water, and phosphate buffer was measured through human and mouse skin in vitro. Membranes were mounted in glass diffusion cells and acrylic acid was applied in each solvent at 0.01 %, 0.1 %, 1 %, and 4 %, respectively (100 µL/cm2) under occlusive conditions. Samples were taken from the receptor solutions at recorded times, between 0 and 32 hr, and assayed for 14C content which was regarded as equivalent to acrylic acid. Steady state absorption rates were calculated to be between 0.007 µg/cm2/hr (human, 0.01 % AA in phosphate buffer) and 201 µg/cm2/hr (mouse, 4 % AA in acetone). Thus, absorption rates were influenced by the vehicle (acetone > water > phosphate buffer) and were proportional to the applied concentration in each vehicle. Mouse skin was 3 times more permeable than human skin under the conditions of the in vitro study (BAMM 1988).

 

C3H mice and Fischer 344 rats, respectively, were treated dermally (10 or 40 mg/kg bw in acetone) with [1-14C]-acrylic acid. After cutaneous application to mice, about 12% of the dose was absorbed, while the remainder was apparently evaporated. Approximately 80% of the absorbed fraction of the dose was metabolised to14CO2within 24 h. Excretion in urine and faeces each accounted for less than 0.5% of the dose. Elimination of radioactivity from plasma, liver, and kidney was rapid; however, levels in fat were higher at 72 h (0.5% of the higher dose) than at 8 h (0.1% of the higher dose). After cutaneous administration to rats, 19-26% of the dose was absorbed. Disposition of the absorbed fraction of the dose was similar to results found in mice. Results from an in vitro experiment with rat skin (Frantz cell) showed that at least 60 % of the applied dose evaporated and about 25% was absorbed, confirming the in vivo results. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of rat urine and rat and mouse tissues indicated that absorbed AA was rapidly metabolized by the ß-oxidation pathway of propionate catabolism (Black et al., 1995).

No evaporation of dermally applied sodium acrylate from the skin is expected, but the absorbed fraction will be rapidly metabolised by the same pathway as described for acrylic acid.