Registration Dossier

Administrative data

Endpoint:
other distribution data
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
supporting study
Study period:
Not reported
Reliability:
2 (reliable with restrictions)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Experimental data conducted in accordance with sound scientific principles.

Data source

Reference
Reference Type:
publication
Title:
Emissions of organophosphate and brominated flame retardants from selected consumer products and building materials
Author:
Kemmlein, S., Hahn, O. and Jann, O.
Year:
2003
Bibliographic source:
Atmos. Environ. 37: 5485-5493

Materials and methods

Test guideline
Qualifier:
no guideline followed
Principles of method if other than guideline:
The emissions of selected flame retardants were measured in 1- and 0.02-m³ emission test chambers and 0.001-m³ emission test cells. Four product groups were of interest: insulating materials, assembly foam, upholstery/mattresses and electronics equipment. The experiments were performed under constant environmental conditions using a fixed sample surface area and controlled air flow rates.
GLP compliance:
not specified
Type of study:
other: emission
Media:
other: consumer products

Test material

Reference
Name:
Unnamed
Type:
Constituent
Type:
Constituent
Details on test material:
- Name of test material (as cited in study report): TBBPA
- Source of test material: Part of a PC housing ~0.1 m²); post-consumer system provided by a recycling plant. Bromine content of 5.9%, produced in 1995.

Results and discussion

Any other information on results incl. tables

Due to its phenolic character, TBBPA has relatively low vapour pressure and tends to adsorb to surfaces. Over a 150-d test, no emission could be detected from the PC housing but measurement of TBBPA in the solvent used to rinse the test chamber walls shows 356 ng m^-2 of TBBPA on the chamber surfaces. Using this value, the area specific emission rate (SERa) was calculated to be 0.4 ng m^-2 h^-1.

 

Additionally as part of the overall experiment, two systems consisting of a monitor, PC, mouse, keyboard and printer (system A) and a monitor, PC, mouse and keyboard (system B) was examined for FR content. At the end of the experiments, concentrations of TBBPA of 116 and 64 ng m^-2 were observed on the 22-cm-diameter, convex glass pieces that had been used in the tests of system A and system B, respectively. This evidence of FR adsorption to surfaces in the test chamber (chamber sink effects) underscores a high potential for interferences with the measurement of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) emissions.

Applicant's summary and conclusion

Conclusions:
The area specific emission rate (SERa) was calculated to be 0.4 ng/m²/h. The conclusion from the data is that losses from the computer housing were low.
Executive summary:

The emissions of selected flame retardants were measured in 1- and 0.02-m³ emission test chambers and 0.001-m³ emission test cells. Four product groups were of interest: insulating materials, assembly foam, upholstery/mattresses and electronics equipment. The experiments were performed under constant environmental conditions using a fixed sample surface area and controlled air flow rates.

The objective of the present study was to determine emissions of selected BFRs (polybrominated flame retardants) and POCs (organophosphoric compounds) from selected consumer products and building materials, and to expand the existing knowledge base related to the contribution of these products/materials to contamination of the indoor environment.

Due to its phenolic character, TBBPA has relatively low vapour pressure and tends to adsorb to surfaces. Over a 150-d test, no emission could be detected from the PC housing but measurement of TBBPA in the solvent used to rinse the test chamber walls showed 356 ng/m² of TBBPA on the chamber surfaces. Using this value, the area specific emission rate (SERa) was calculated to be 0.4 ng/m²/h. The conclusion from the data is that losses from the computer housing were low.