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Physical & Chemical properties

Melting point / freezing point

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Reference
Endpoint:
melting point/freezing point
Type of information:
experimental study
Adequacy of study:
key study
Study period:
7 October 2011 to 9 December 2011
Reliability:
1 (reliable without restriction)
Rationale for reliability incl. deficiencies:
other: Study conducted in accordance with OECD and EU guidelines.
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
EU Method A.1 (Melting / Freezing Temperature)
Deviations:
no
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
OECD Guideline 102 (Melting point / Melting Range)
Deviations:
no
Qualifier:
according to
Guideline:
other: OECD 113 (1981) Screening test for thermal stability and stability in air
Deviations:
no
GLP compliance:
no
Type of method:
thermal analysis
Melting / freezing pt.:
> 500 °C
Decomposition:
no

Thermal Stability (DSC)

The DSC-measurements in closed glass crucibles with the test item showed two endothermic effects in the temperature range 175 °C to 235 °C and 270 °C to 315 °C. No further exothermic or endothermic effects were observed up to the final temperature (400 °C and 500 °C, respectively).

An optical inspection showed directly after the measurement reddish vapours in the crucible. After cooling down only a white solid was observed.

Melting Point / Melting Range (DSC)

One measurement in an open glass crucible showed two endothermic effects in the temperature ranges 45 °C to 170 °C and 255 °C to 370 °C, respectively. In the temperature range 370 °C to 450 °C with an energy of 15 J/g.

An optical inspection of the test item after the measurement showed a yellowish discolouration. After cooling down the test item was white again. The test item was still a powder.

Due to the optical inspection it can be concluded, that the test item has no melting point up to 500 °C. Due to the optical inspection after the measurement for thermal stability (closed glass crucibles) it can be assumed that at least one of the endothermic effects was caused by the development of nitrous gases (even if the temperature ranges differ from the measurements in closed glass crucibles to those in an open glass crucible).

Conclusions:
The test item, bismuth subnitrate, has a melting point > 500 °C under atmospheric conditions.
Executive summary:

The purpose of this study was the determination of the thermal stability and melting point of the test item according to the European Commission Regulation (EC) No. 440/2008, Part A: Methods for the determination of physico-chemical properties. A.1. Melting point / melting range and OECD test guidelines, OECD 102 (1995) Melting point/melting range, OECD 113 (1981) Screening test for thermal stability and stability in air.

Due to the optical inspection it can be concluded, that the test item has no melting point up to 500 °C.

Description of key information

Bismuth subnitrate has a melting point greater than 500 °C

Key value for chemical safety assessment

Melting / freezing point at 101 325 Pa:
500 °C

Additional information

A study was conducted to determine the thermal stability and melting point of the test item according to the European Commission Regulation (EC) No. 440/2008, Part A: Methods for the determination of physico-chemical properties. A.1. Melting point / melting range and OECD test guidelines, OECD 102 (1995) Melting point/melting range, OECD 113 (1981) Screening test for thermal stability and stability in air.

Due to the optical inspection it can be concluded, that the test item has no melting point up to 500 °C.